Lydon Lynch

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Commercial Residential Institutional Interiors Sustainable

                  Halifax Seaport Farmer’s Market
                  Halifax, Nova Scotia
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                  Sacred Heart School
                  Halifax, Nova Scotia
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                  Marion Mccain Building
                  Halifax, Nova Scotia
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                  Lunenburg County Lifestyle Centre
                  Lunenburg, Nova Scotia
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                  Lunenburg County Justice Centre
                  Lunenburg, Nova Scotia
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                  Dalhousie Student Union Building
                  Halifax, Nova Scotia
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                  RCMP Regional Headquarters
                  Dartmouth, Nova Scotia
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                  Dalhousie Arts Centre
                  Halifax, Nova Scotia
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                  The Seaport Farmers’ Market is an award winning, platinum designed ecological showcase on the Halifax Waterfront. The Seaport Farmers’ Market uses 75% less power and 75% less water a typical market building. Harvesting free natural resources and responding to the seasons, the new Market is one of the most sustainably designed, low energy buildings in North America.

                  The award winning Seaport Farmers’ Market transformed a former seaport terminal into a LEED® Platinum designed ecological showcase on the Halifax waterfront, becoming the centerpiece of the Halifax Port Authority’s Seaport Redevelopment and Cruise Ship Terminal. The Seaport Farmers’ Market uses 70% less power and water than that required by the National Model Energy Code. Harvesting free natural wind, solar and geothermal energy and responding to the seasons, the new Market is one of the most sustainably designed, low energy buildings in North America. The Seaport Market has won awards and been widely published for its architecture and sustainable approach.

                  A new Boy’s School is added to the original historic Girl’s School providing classrooms for grades 7-12, gymnasium, cafeteria, library, seminar rooms, science lab, lounges and administration. The design takes into consideration the historic nature of the original school and creates a new quad which creates an overall identity to the campus. The gymnasium is placed on the top floor and becomes a ‘lantern’ toward the street and the Public Gardens. The new school strengthens its urban relationship and creates a new campus quality while providing a contemporary learning environment for students and faculty.

                  The new faculty building consolidates numerous departments throughout the campus into one cohesive facility. The building contains two large lecture theaters, classrooms, student lounge, faculty and graduate offices, and underground parking. Designed to both its residential and campus context, the sandstone and clapboard exterior, projecting bays, generous windows and landscaped roof terraces reflect the scale and character of its surrounding properties. A central courtyard becomes the focus of the building which is overlooked by student lounges, communicating stairs and roof terraces. Lydon Lynch was the recipient of the Lieutenant Governor’s Award for Architecture in 2001.

                  The Lunenburg County Lifestyle Centre is the largest community centre in southern Nova Scotia, featuring an aquatics centre, the south shore’s main library, community spaces, dance studios, yoga studios and a NHL sized rink, concert and tradeshow venue. The project enhances the community’s health and wellness by creating a social heartland designed to LEED® Gold standards.

                  The LEED Gold designed Lifestyle Centre minimizes its ecological footprint and provides the healthiest indoor environment possible with renewable energy, fresh air ventilation, non-toxic materials, sustainably harvesting wood and regionally produced, recycled materials. On site renewable technologies such as solar hot water and geothermal energy combine with high efficiency envelops, waste heat recovery systems and naturally day lit program spaces to reduce loads and operating costs. Energy efficient mechanical systems, high efficiency lighting and passive ventilation strategies further contribute to reduce CO2 emissions and operating costs by 60%.

                  The design provides an appropriate presence within the community as a place of justice. While traditional features include strong symmetry and proportions, use of masonry, sloped roofs and entry tower, it expresses a contemporary and accessible facility that is there to serve the public. All areas, including courtrooms are designed with access to natural light and views. The design resolves the complex need to separate a variety of circulation paths and functional adjacencies while maintaining security and a clear understanding of the building. The Justice Centre is certified as LEED Silver. Lydon Lynch was the recipient of the Lieutenant Governor’s Award for Architecture in 1988.

                  The new Student Union Building is designed as a living room on campus, providing more common areas, hub spaces and open plan office areas for students, staff and campus societies. Sustainable innovations include renewable energy via integrated PV solar panels, a mechanically integrated, bio-filtration green wall to reduce VOC and airborne toxins from the ventilation system, and natural seasonal exterior green shading.

                  The new facility serves all the RCMP’s operations throughout Nova Scotia and incorporates a complex program of administrative and technical functions including training classrooms, holding cells, exercise facilities, cafeteria, officer’s messes and investigation units. The facility accommodates over 500 personnel with strategies for future expansion. The facility is designed to provide an appropriate architectural image for the RCMP which respects their Canadian heritage and acknowledges them as one of the world’s most innovative police forces. The project is registered as LEED gold.

                  This 250,000 square foot facility consolidates all RCMP operations into one state-of-the-art facility. The building is LEED Gold and incorporates many sustainable features such as rainwater harvesting, daylight harvesting, maximize recycling of construction waste, use of recycled materials, high efficiency mechanical systems and building envelope performance and durability.

                  The Dalhousie University Arts Centre Project renovates the existing Dal Arts Centre and adds 45,000 sq. ft. of new cultural spaces for the Fountain School of Performing Arts. New cultural spaces will include a 300 seat Recital Hall, costume studies design studios, practice rooms and rehearsal halls. Conceived as a cultural cathedral, the naturally daylit, naturally acoustic Recital Hall will provide an exceptional acoustic environment for teaching and performing.

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